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Verona
Verona

Ultimate Verona Travel Guide

Verona is many things. It is the setting of two of Shakespeare’s works – “Romeo and Juliet” and “The Two Gentlemen of Verona” – making it a top destination for fans of literature and love. It is a town with many bustling fairs, events, and festivals which celebrate the city’s vast history and many passions. It is a UNESCO World Heritage site with spectacular Roman and Medieval monuments, buildings, and churches to explore. It is home of a unique and hearty cuisine, characterized by a variety of meats and rich locally produced wines. It is a truly amazing destination to visit, filled with countless sightseeing opportunities, immersive activities to enjoy, and a vast historic culture to experience.

Verona’s growth into the Veneto region’s largest city began during the reign of the Roman Empire. The city was desired due to its strategic position for military and commerce. The importance Verona had to the Romans can be seen today in the form of the city’s many Roman relics that are still present in Verona – the amphitheater, Roman gates, stunning bridges, and more. In fact, Verona’s wealth of Roman ruins is second only to that of Rome. After Roman times, the city grew continuously throughout the reign of many leaders. In the early 1400s, Verona came under the control of Venice. Influences of Venetian features can be seen throughout the city today, as well. When the region of Veneto was united with Italy in 1866, Verona became an Italian destination with a multiculturally influenced identity.

Home to over 250,000 people, Verona is one of Northern Italy’s top travel destinations. Its key attractions include the mammoth Verona Amphitheater, known as the Arena di Verona or Verona Arena, bustling squares Piazza delle Erbe and Piazza Bra, the city’s Fair and Summer theater season, and the many “Romeo and Juliet” sightseeing locales.

Despite being a large city, it has a provincial and historic feel. Locals and travelers alike explore the historic city center and piazze, taking in the city’s unique architecture, shops, and restaurants. Even more impressive is the fact that much of the architecture features stunning pink hued limestone from the Valpolicella region, making a sunset walk through the city center purely magical. Verona offers the best of Italy – stunning art, amazing architecture, fascinating history, and rich culture.

In addition to being an amazing travel destination in itself, Verona is close enough to other popular destinations such as Venice and Lake Garda, as well as Veneto’s wine areas, such as Soave and Valpolicella, that it makes a great starting point for exploring Northern Italy.

GEOGRAFY & CLIMATE  

Verona is located in the northern section of Italy in the region of Veneto. The city is cut by the Adige River and covers an area of 80 square miles. Verona is the largest city in Vento and the fifth largest in Northern Italy, making it a wonderful place to live and visit.

The climate of Verona is classified as humid subtropical, despite the city’s Northern location. This climate is due to the fact that the city is located on a plain as opposed to in the northern mountains of Italy. Travelers can expect hot summers averaging 80–85°F and cold winters averaging 40–45°F. Winters also bring precipitation and high levels of humidity, which often result in characteristic fog that hangs from daybreak to late morning.

WHEN IN VERONA

Visit the one of a kind Arena di Verona. The third largest open-air theater in Italy, this Roman Arena was once the home of ancient gladiator shows. The history of the space is palpable, and the sheer size of the theater is staggering. In contrast to other Roman amphitheaters, the Arena is still used regularly. It can accommodate approximately 15,000 guests and is the home of some of Verona’s most popular events, including concerts and the city’s renowned summer opera season.

Verona has plenty of sightseeing opportunities with a variety of historic monuments and buildings. From the city’s Romanesque Cathedral to remnants of ancient Roman gates to Medieval churches, there are countless buildings, piazze, bridges, castles, and more that reflect Verona’s rich history. The short list includes Piazza Bra, Torre dei Lamberti, Castelvecchio, Ponte Pietra, and Palazzo Maffei, but it could go on and on. In fact, the city has been named a UNESCO World Heritage Site for its spectacularly well-preserved structures and monuments.

Explore the world of Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.” As the setting for the world’s most famous and tragic love story, Verona is home to many sites that evoke the spirit and passion of the classic play. Travelers can see firsthand the famous balcony at Juliet’s house, Romeo’s home, and the tomb of Juliet.

Indulge in the area’s rich, hearty, and flavorful cuisine. Characterized by thick, homemade pasta, rich, meaty sauces, and delicious local produce, the cuisine of Verona pairs perfectly with the area’s full-bodied, top of the line wines. Wine lovers will also enjoy a trip to Verona because the city is in the middle of one of Italy’s biggest and best wine production regions. Verona hosts a massive annual wine fair, Vinitaly, which attracts thousands of visitors and features an unparalleled selection of wines and wine-centric events. During the event, Veneto’s most eminent wines are on full display including Prosecco, Soave, Amarone, Pinot Grigio, and more.

Explore the city’s museums. From contemporary art in the Palazzo Forti to historic paintings and sculptures in the Castelvecchio museum to the natural fossils and ancient artifacts in the city’s Natural History Museum, there is a little bit of everything to see in Verona’s museums.

Located along the picturesque Adige River just a stone’s throw away from Italy’s largest lake, fair Verona more than lives up to its Shakespearean fame. The medieval city center, characterized by the majestic Arena di Verona, sprawling squares, and stately buildings, has earned the love and admiration of international travelers for centuries.